Change in Mind Webinar Series

We are pleased to announce the Change in Mind Webinar Series, free webinars on various aspects of brain science and the critical role of nonprofit, human-serving organizations in advancing the work at the systems level to establish lasting impact.

Upcoming Webinars

Past Webinars Available for Download (No Charge)

Engaging the African American Community
This webinar explores challenges to effectively engage the African American community. It will help to increase awareness of the link between historical and/or intergenerational trauma. Finally, discussion includes trauma informed promising practices and possible conscious and implicit bias.

Applying Science of Child Development
How can we use insights from cutting-edge science to improve the well-being and long-term prospects of the children and families involved in the child welfare system? This webinar will first review work by the Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University to synthesize and translate relevant scientific knowledge, then examine how that knowledge might be applied to child welfare policy and practice.

Catching Kids Before They Fall
This webinar will present research showing that disruptive behaviors in schools come from students with trauma and toxic stress. Caring adult relationships are key to implementing a Trauma Informed Model. Webinar participants will be introduced to strategies to help students de-escalate and self-regulate, staying connected with learning and their teacher. Educators play a major role in assisting children to change their life path to bring them fulfillment and purpose.

Putting Brain Science to Work
Frontiers of Innovation (FOI) is the research and development platform of the Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University. The FOI model uses a structured process to identify and target key adult and child capacities and tests what works for which segments of the population and why. The intervention is subjected to a rapid cycle of learning and adaptation, to encourage putting the latest brain science to use as soon as is prudent. 

Well-being is a Skill
This webinar considered scientific evidence that suggests we can change our brains by transforming our minds and develop habits of mind that will improve well-being. These mental training strategies can be used to improve the well-being of children, teachers, parents, and ultimately communities. Richard J. Davidson, MD, the William James and Vilas research professor of psychology and psychiatry, director of the Waisman Laboratory for Brain Imaging and Behavior, and founder of the Center for Investigating Healthy Minds at the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Waisman Center, is the presenter.

Neuroscience Behind Supporting New Parents and Children
This webinar presented strong emerging evidence in support of investments in both parents and children during the co-occurring sensitive period of early life and transition to parenting. Failing to do so, the research suggests, may have long-term consequences.

The presenter reviewed the current understanding of the core supportive neurobiology of parenting. Participants also learned about evidence of impairments in supportive parenting neurobiology when parents themselves have a history of adverse caregiving or current mental health concerns.

Aligning Policy Efforts with Brain Science
This webinar offers a practical breakdown of why advocacy is so important and how it can effectively make an impact on public policy. In addition, attendees will learn how to create an advocacy plan, select advocacy strategies, and discuss several key advocacy tips and tactics.

Presenter Marlo Nash, senior vice president of public policy and mobilization for the Alliance for Strong Families and Communities, will introduce a new Brain Science Advocacy Toolkit. The toolkit, assembled by the Alliance in response to input from the Change in Mind Policy Community of Practice, can be used by a nonprofit to mobilize the support base and maximize advocacy impact at the local and national levels.

Balancing ACEs with HOPE
This webinar will provide an overview of Health Outcomes of Positive Experiences (HOPE), which focuses on a child's own experiences and the emerging understanding of positive human development and the factors and experiences that promote it. The HOPE approach will help ground our understanding of the effectiveness of an intervention in the child's experiences.

Our ever deepening understanding of human development opens the door to unprecedented advances in child health and well-being. Breakthrough findings in developmental neuroscience, epigenetics, and biology, and existing knowledge in psychology, sociology, and humanities point to the importance of understanding the whole spectrum of childhood experiences and developing a new science of thriving.

Building Core Capabilities for Life
Our ever deepening understanding of human development opens the door to unprecedented advances in child health and well-being. Breakthrough findings in developmental neuroscience, epigenetics, and biology, and existing knowledge in psychology, sociology, and humanities point to the importance of understanding the whole spectrum of childhood experiences and developing a new science of thriving.

Jack P. Shonkoff, M.D., director of the Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University will be sharing information on a paper recently released by the Center on the Developing Child titled "Building Core Capabilities for Life.

Play as a Solution
Society's well-being begins with a child's well-being. Play is central to a child's ability to grow into a productive adult. But a healthy balance of play is falling victim to TV, video games, structured schedules, declining recess time, and a lack of access to safe play spaces.

In addition, one of the major barriers to healthy development-particularly for the 16 million children living in poverty-is toxic stress. The American Academy of Pediatrics has repeatedly stated that play provides a critical time for parents to be fully engaged and bond with their children. Thus, play is a part of the solution to creating the supportive, responsive relationships with caring adults that research has shown can help prevent the detrimental effects of toxic stress response.

Using the ACE Survey in Your Organization
This webinar will orient participants to tips and other tools to conduct the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) survey within your organization. The National Crittenton Foundation (TNCF), in partnership with ASCEND at the Aspen Institute, developed a comprehensive adverse childhood experiences (ACE) survey toolkit to equip human service providers with the tools and tips needed to administer the ACE survey.

TNCF developed the ACEs survey toolkit for providers based on the implementation of the ACE survey with participating members of the Crittenton family of agencies, which provide services to girls and young women impacted by violence, childhood adversity, and the resulting trauma.

What Neuroscience Tells Us About Strong Organizations
This webinar provides an overview of recent research that informs us on the cost to an organization when its culture is unhealthy. Specifics about how healthy organizational cultures are created and sustained will be explored.

Studies have shown the detrimental effects to organizational performance and mental and physical well-being of staff when organizations are unhealthy. Due to the increasing interest in the field of neuroscience and its applicability to improving organizational health and well-being, this webinar provides an overview of recent research that informs us about the cost to an organization when its culture is unhealthy.

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